Most Magical Gym on Earth

The drone of cicadas fills the air as we make our way through a nearly silent campus lush with summer foliage. As we enter the gym used for men’s and women’s rhythmic gymnastics, college gymnasts are doing assisted stretching and helping each other to warm up…

Kokushikan University Tama Campus

Two years ago, I visited Kokushikan Tama Sports Campus for the first time and had the opportunity to meet the Kokushikan group and individual gymnasts. They were boisterous, funny, and more than happy to indulge a novice MRG fan / fledgling journalist’s curiosity (these interviews provided the foundation for articles for Metropolis Magazine and Pacific Stars and Stripes articles in English and Japanese). As one of a very few foreign MRG fans in Japan, I’ve been blessed to receive a warm welcome from some of Japan’s top high school and college coaches, fellow fans, and MRG parents.

Yuhei Ishikawa and Sarah

In the following two years, I’ve done my best to distribute English-language information about Japanese men’s rhythmic gymnastics by writing articles, sharing English-subtitled videos and posts with various SNS (social media) groups and pages and assisting with proofreading for MRG videos and English articles on Kokushikan RG Team’s website. (Unfortunately due to my full-time job, travel, and writing obligations, I have been unable to attend any further MRG practices or competitions in person since All-Japan in 2017.)

On this day, Kokushikan individual gymnasts were rehearsing for the upcoming All-Japan Inter-College competition. (For men’s RG, first gymnasts compete in regional competitions before competing at the national level by category (All-Japan Inter-High, which was just held in Kagoshima, Kyushu last week, and All-Japan Inter-College), and finally the top gymnasts and teams go on to compete at the All-Japan National Championships in late October. It is every gymnast’s dream to be crowned All-Japan champion during his career.

Kaede Iwata

Kokushikan’s gym instantly felt familiar and welcoming. There was a crackle of electricity in the air as this was no ordinary practice, but intense fine-tuning and self-critique to improve weak points prior to the All-Japan Inter-College competition. I had previously met / interviewed some of the same gymnasts in 2017, while others were new additions (Keisuke Tanaka, whom I previously wrote about here: http://rgfan.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-186.html?sp ), is now an individual gymnast at Kokushikan). We also interviewed the All-Japan Inter-High winner, Hiromu Moriya, and had the chance to watch his stick and ring routines (Hiromu’s mom and Yuhei Ishikawa’s mom were also in attendance at today’s practice).

Up first were the Kokushikan Junior team members (some of them started MRG as young as five). The apparatus for juniors is slightly smaller in size than that of older students (according to Coach Yamada, junior sticks are about 70 cm (90 cm full-size), and rings are 35 cm diameter in place of 45 cm diameter). Despite their small size, the junior gymnasts made up for it with enthusiasm.

Next, the Kokushikan individual gymnasts took the spring floor. For today’s rehearsals, they changed into their costumes and ran through their stick and ring routines individually. Gymnasts who were not performing sat at a table and scored using score sheets similar to those used by competition judges based on the various elements (men’s RG is scored based on execution (10 points) and difficulty (10 points) for a maximum possible score of 20 points, with deductions made for missing elements, broken or dropped apparatus, low throws, etc.).

Ryunosuke Tanimoto and Sarah

Each individual gymnast’s costume and apparatus is uniquely his; the design makes it easy to visually identify a gymnast from the stands. A gymnast may have several costume changes depending on the routine (some gymnasts have a separate costume for each apparatus) and may continue to use the same costumes for a number of years (one gymnast I spoke to had used the same costume for at least five years since high school). In a curious contrast to the seemingly skimpy costumes of women’s RG, men’s RG costumes are full-coverage from the neck to wrists to ankles.

The beautiful designs are reminiscent of men’s figure skating costumes, embellished with sequins, lace, and sometimes thousands of crystals that are hand-sewn to withstand the dramatic forces of tumbling. In some cases, a gymnast’s mother may design his costumes, or some use professional designers. Today’s designs included several gymnasts with striking red, black and silver themes, while others called to mind organic vines and leaves, flowers (roses were popular), or bursts of glittering fireworks. Gymnasts also customize their apparatus using metallic tape, glitter, and spray paint to make them easily identifiable (particularly for rings, which are tossed high into the air; a gymnast may use the markings to help him spot / catch).

Gymnasts use every part of their body as well as their apparatus to emote, and men’s RG is as much performance art and dance as it is floor gymnastics. Individual gymnasts in particular include a great variety of beautiful opening and closing poses, hand gestures, and beautiful lines to express emotion, along with their song choices (a recent rule change finally allowed men’s RG to use songs with vocals / lyrics).

Although the gymnasts make the routines seem effortless (they seem to practically float across the spring floor), it was a bit shocking to see them near collapse at the end of individual routines (which can be up to one minute thirty seconds) after approaching the “judges,” Coach Yamada, and visitors and bowing to each group individually thanking them, sometimes gasping for breath as they did so. (Japanese summers are notoriously hot and brutal; heatstroke is a real danger for young Japanese athletes as many school gymnasiums are not air-conditioned).

Teammates would quickly help them unzip the back of their uniform tops (which trap body heat), and the previous performer would take to the sidelines to do stretches, rehydrate, and cheer on the next performing teammate while catching their breath for the next routine.

In between routines as the judges were scoring, I had the chance to ask questions of some of the gymnasts, who were kind enough to take time to answer. One of my burning questions for the Ibara gymnasts at Kokushikan (Ibara High just won All-Japan Inter-High in a stunning return to glory) was how they achieve their extraordinary flexibility (men’s rhythmic gymnasts already have a great range of flexibility, but Ibara spectacularly so).

Motonari Asao (He was a member of Ibara High School RG team)

I had the chance to talk to Keisuke Tanaka about stick technique. It was fascinating watching him as he seemed to be executing complicated mills unconsciously while walking around. I was curious about some of the moves I saw gymnasts do, including one where they roll the stick down the back of one arm, across the top of the shoulders, across the opposite arm, and then effortlessly catch it with the opposite hand. Gymnasts are given additional points for more difficult moves. Keisuke mentioned that for stick, it is all about careful control of the rotation speed. I also had the precious opportunity to take photos with several of the individual gymnasts including Hiromu Moriya, Takuto Kawahigashi, Yuhei Ishikawa and Ryunosuke Tanimoto, something which I didn’t get to do on my previous visit to Kokushikan or at All-Japan in 2017.

In all, we spent about five hours watching the individual gymnasts run through their routines. It was magical to be back in Kokushikan’s gym and spend time together as I often think of my friends and watch their performances online. Kokushikan gymnasts are frequently invited overseas to participate in festivals, gymnastics events, and to conduct workshops, and they are fantastic overseas ambassadors for Japanese Men’s RG.

Takuto Kawahigashi, 2019 All Eastern Inter-College champion

I am wishing my friends at Kokushikan error-free and injury-free performances at All-Japan Inter-College and All-Japan finals, I will be cheering for you!

(A huge thank you to Coach Yamada and Ms. Hiromi Matsumoto for coordinating / allowing me to sit in on today’s practice, ありがとうございました)

 

Sarah and Hiromu Moriya (Kokushikan High School)

「地球上で一番素敵な体育館」

耳をつんざくセミの鳴き声に包まれながら、人気のないキャンパスに青々と茂る木々の中を通り、体育館に着いた。そこでは、男女の新体操選手たちがお互いに補助しあいながらウォームアップのストレッチをしていた。

2年前、私は国士舘大学の多摩キャンパスを初めて訪問し、国士舘大学の団体・個人の選手たちに会う機会を持った。彼らは陽気で明るく、新米の男子新体操ファンのわがままを聞き、ジャーナリストとしてまだよちよち歩きだった私の好奇心に応えてくれた(この時のインタビューは、Metropolis MagazinePacific Stars and Stripesの記事のもとになった)。日本に住む外国人の男子新体操ファンは珍しいためか、高校や大学の強豪チームの指導者や保護者、ファンの皆さんは、私を非常にあたたかく歓迎してくださる。

その後2年間、日本の男子新体操の情報を拡散するために、自分にできる限りのことをしてきた。記事を書いたり、英語字幕のついた動画やSNSの投稿をシェアしたり、動画や国士舘大学新体操部のホームページの英文校正をしたりした。(残念なことに、仕事や旅行、記事執筆の都合で、2017年の全日本以来、試合には行けていない)

この日、国士舘の個人選手たちは全日本インカレの試技会をしていた。男子新体操ではまず地区予選があり、その後全国大会(先週九州の鹿児島で行われたインターハイやインカレ)に進み、最終的に上位の選手やチームが10月の全日本に出場する。全日本のチャンピオンになることは、すべての新体操選手の夢である。

国士舘の体育館に入るなり、私は懐かしさを覚えた。ピリピリと緊張した空気が充満していた。というのも、今日の練習は普段の練習とは違い、全日本インカレ前の調整と、弱点を改良するための厳しい確認が行われていたからだ。2017年の訪問時にもインタビューさせてもらった選手もいたが、国士舘に新たに加わった選手もいた。田中啓介選手については過去に記事にしたことがあるが(http://rgfan.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-186.html?sp)、彼も今は国士舘の個人選手となっていた。また、インターハイで優勝した森谷祐夢選手にインタビューし、スティックとリングの演技を見ることもできた。

最初、国士舘ジュニアの選手たち(早い子は5歳から新体操を始めている)が練習していた。ジュニアの手具は、少しサイズが小さくなっている。山田監督によると、ジュニアのスティックは約70cm(普通は90cm)、リングは直径35cm(普通は45cm)とのこと。その小ささに負けないほどの熱意を持って、ジュニアの選手たちは練習していた。

次に国士舘大学の個人選手たちがフロアに上がった。今日の試技会では試合着を着てスティックとリングの通しを行った。演技をしない選手たちはテーブルに座り、試合で使用されるのと同じようなスコアシートで採点をしていた。男子新体操の採点は、構成10点、実施10点の計20点で行われ、要素が欠けたり、手具の破損や落下などで減点される。

個人選手のコスチュームと手具は独自に装飾されており、そのデザインによって見分けがつくようになっている。演技ごとにレオタードを変える選手もいるし、同じレオタードを何年も着続ける選手もいる(ある選手は高校時代から5年間同じものを着ているとのこと)。女子のレオタードは体を覆う面積が小さいが、男子の場合は首から手首・足首まで全体が覆われているところが興味深い。

レオタードの美しいデザインは男子フィギュアスケートを連想させる。キラキラした金属やレース、おびただしいクリスタルが、激しいタンブリングにも耐えうるように手作業で縫い付けられている。母親がデザインする場合もあるし、プロに依頼する場合もある。今日、私が見た中では、鮮やかな赤と黒、銀色のデザインや、植物の蔓や葉、花をモチーフにしたもの(バラが人気のようだ)、華やかな花火のようなものなどがあった。選手は自分の手具も装飾する。メタリックなテープ、マニキュア、スプレーなどを使い、見分けやすくしている。特にリングについては、空中に投げ上げた時に、装飾によってキャッチしやすくなる場合もあるのだという。

選手は体のあらゆる部分を使って感情表現する。男子新体操は、床で行われる体操というよりは、パフォーマンス芸術あるいはダンスという感じがする。特に個人選手の場合は、演技開始・終了時のポーズだったり、指先の表現、美しい体の線、そして音楽で感情を表現している。(最近ルール変更が行われ、男子でもボーカル入りの曲を使えるようになった)

選手たちはまったく苦もなく演技をしているように見えるけれども(フロアの上をなめらかに漂っているかのようだ)、1分30秒の演技の後に崩れ落ちそうになっているのを見て驚いた。演技後に苦しそうな呼吸をしながら審判、山田監督、見学者それぞれに歩み寄ってお礼を言うのだ。日本の夏は悪名高く、酷暑である。学校の体育館の多くはエアコンがないため、若い日本の選手たちは熱中症の危険にさらされている。

演技が終わるとチームメイトが急いで選手の背中のファスナーを下げ、体の熱を逃す。その後フロアの横でストレッチをし、水分を補給し、次の演技者に声援を送りながら呼吸を整える。

演技と演技の合間に審判が採点している時、何人かの選手に質問することができ、彼らはとても親切に答えてくれた。私がどうしても聞きたかった質問に、高校総体で圧巻の演技をして優勝に輝いた井原高校の選手は、どうやってあの見事な柔軟性を身につけたのか?というものがあった。男子新体操選手はかなり高い柔軟性を持っているが、井原の選手は特にそうなのだ。(訳注:国士舘にいる井原出身の浅尾選手がこの質問に答えてくれました。)

田中啓介選手には、スティックの技術について聞くことができた。彼が半ば無意識に複雑な操作をしながら歩き回っているのを見るのは、とても面白かった。選手たちがよくやる、スティックを片方の腕に沿って転がして肩の後ろを通し、いかにも簡単そうに反対側の手でキャッチする動きに興味を抱いた。試合では、難しい手具操作を入れると加点がもらえる。田中選手が説明してくれたところによると、スティックに関して重要なのは、回転のスピードをコントロールすることだという。また幸運なことに、森谷選手、川東拓斗選手、石川裕平選手、そして谷本龍之介選手と写真を撮ることもできた。

結局、5時間ほど個人の試技を見ることができた。再び国士舘の体育館を訪れ、選手たちと時を過ごせたことは本当に夢のような時間だった。国士舘の選手たちは日本の男子新体操を広めるための素晴らしい大使として、海外のフェスティバルや体操イベントに参加し、ワークショップを行ったりもしている。

国士舘の皆様が、全日本インカレやジャパンでノーミスで怪我のない演技ができますよう、心より祈念しています。

(本日の練習を見学させていただくことを許可していただいた山田監督に感謝申し上げます。ありがとうございました。)